How-To: Smoking Meat on a Weber Grill

By October 4, 2012December 16th, 2014DIY, Food, How-To, Meat

DSC_3257

Earlier this spring when we were contemplating what to replace our old worn-out grill with, I found myself a little torn. While we grill pretty traditionally for the most part, I really wanted to be sure we could also smoke with whatever we ended up buying. We looked at Green Eggs, traditional barrel smokers and regular grills, and eventually chose a Weber grill. In my research I’d read in a few places that you can “smoke” meat on them and felt optimistic that I could make one of them work.

The challenge I repeatedly came across the first few times I tried smoking meat was that it was hard to keep temperatures consistent while continually adding or removing charcoal. So when I came across this method online while surfing some discussion boards, it seemed like the perfect solution to my problem. Simply circle the charcoal and wood around the grill for a slow burn. I tried it and it worked! The “fuse” of wood and charcoal slowly burned around the grill, maintaining an even, clean burn that lasts roughly 4 hours before you have to rebuild it.

You’ll need:

  • Kingsford charcoal briquettes
  • Lighter fluid
  • smoking chips
    or smoking wood blocks
  • drip pan
  • lighter
  • …don’t forget your choice of meat!

Here is what I did:

  • Create a row of charcoal that lines 3/4 of the outside edge of the grill.
  • Next, a second row of charcoal right next to the first.
  • Then a third that straddles both bottom rows and makes a small triangle like pyramid.

See picture below:

DSC_3194

Then:

  • Place wood chips about one-quarter or half way through the charcoal.
  • Use lighter fluid on one end of the charcoal “fuse.”
  • Light the end and wait for 3-4 of the briquettes to turn white
  • Place a drip pan in the middle of the charcoal grill to catch the drippings
  • Place your meat in the middle of the rack directly over your drip pan.

You can see my setup here and that I have lit one end of the “fuse”

DSC_3195

DSC_3198

Please note:

  • You still need to make sure that you monitor your temps however I found them to be more than adequate to smoke this 6 lb pork shoulder for around 4 hours.
  • After 4-5 hours you will need to rebuild your fuse and light it again.

I often opt to oven-finish. I believe the smoke is deep enough into the meat, as deep as it will get, and that oven-finishing is simply just finishing the cooking.

Looks good doesn’t it?

DSC_3233

DSC_3246

By the way, this Martha Stewart meat thermometer with remote “pager” (it vibrates when the meat is getting close to your set temp) is awesome!

DSC_3243

DSC_3244

I’ve used this method on a variety of meats, and so far it’s worked perfectly every time. I love its versatility and how simply and uncomplicated it’s made smoking.

DSC_3252

Paired with a colorful veggie salad, this made for some awesome weekend Paleo eats!

One Comment